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Bryan

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Posts posted by Bryan


  1. That would probably help, Sean, but it wouldn't be exactly what I'm looking for.

     

    AVG business edition has hierarchical polices. There is a policy that applies to all workstations. Changes to this policy are automatically propagated to all workstations within the organization. One can also set a policy that applies only to specific groups of stations. It's not a complete, new policy; the admin simply picks settings that should be overridden from the "all stations" policy. Additionally, each station can have its own policy, or set of overriding settings.

     

    This model makes administration very easy: If I need to add a global exception, for example, I go to the "all stations" policy and add an exception. This propagates down to all stations. If I've set up specific policies for specific groups or stations, that deal with other settings, I don't have to worry about going into each policy and adding the exceptions to each policy.

     

    I had expected that CC would improve on this already good system by adding a new top-layer, All Customers policy. With that, If I wanted to change a setting globally, I would simply have to edit one policy, but I wouldn't have to worry about undoing settings that I had specifically made for individual customers, groups, or machines.

     

    Does this make sense?


  2. When CC is installed on a PC with Outlook, there appears an AVG button on the main ribbon. This button pushes other (frequently used) items out of the way, causing consternation for the users (including me!).

     

     

    Why do we need an AVG button in Outlook?


  3. One problem with the policies as they are is that if we want to make a change across the board, we can't. We have to go to each policy in each customer site and change the setting many, many times.

     

    AVG Business policies are hierarchical. I assumed that CC would take this one step further by allowing us to have one central policy at the root. The way it's implemented is a step backward.


  4. We have a fairly long list of exceptions we need to put into every policy (as suggested by our RMM vendor). It would be nice to be able to edit the list (a la AVG 2012) so we can just paste them all in at once.

     

    Alternatively, give us hierarchical policies, and we won't have to worry about it.  ;)

     

    AVG business edition has hierarchical polices. There is a policy that applies to all workstations. Changes to this policy are automatically propagated to all workstations within the organization. One can also set a policy that applies only to specific groups of stations. It's not a complete, new policy; the admin simply picks settings that should be overridden from the "all stations" policy. Additionally, each station can have its own policy, or set of overriding settings.


    This model makes administration very easy: If I need to add a global exception, for example, I go to the "all stations" policy and add an exception. This propagates down to all stations. If I've set up specific policies for specific groups or stations, that deal with other settings, I don't have to worry about going into each policy and adding the exceptions to each policy.


    I had expected that CC would improve on this already good system by adding a new top-layer, All Customers policy. With that, If I wanted to change a setting globally, I would simply have to edit one policy, but I wouldn't have to worry about undoing settings that I had specifically made for individual customers, groups, or machines.

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